100 Movies in 100 Days / Movies

100 Years of Movies in 100 Days – Day 16 – Seven Chances (1925)

Buster Keaton in "Seven Chances"

Buster Keaton in "Seven Chances"

Oh boy, quick turn-around here. After enduring the never-ending (but good) Greed yesterday, (and the watching Yoji Yamada‘s The Hidden Blade later that night), today’s viewing brings us back to a more light-hearted movie. Buster Keaton’s Seven Chances, which, honestly, in today’s society woud be a short film. The premise is that Buster’s grandfather has punched his ticket to heaven and has left him $7 million, but under one condition – he must be married by 7p. on his 27th birthday. It just so happens that he learns about this the morning before the deadline and thus goes about a futile and exhaustive search asking every woman (and a “Scotchman”) if they will marry him.

Nowadays, the proposal would go something like this – So, if you agree to marry me, I’ll give you half of the $2 million (the other $5 million is hush-hush) and then the following day, we can file for a divorce and go on our merry ways. Of course, times were simpler (I think) back in the late 20’s and people were having a great time partying it up in the Roaring 20’s and I supposed marriage actually meant something back then.

Anyway, Buster’s business partner then arranges to have a front page above-the-fold advertisment of the marriage proposal put in the afternoon edition of the local newspaper. Thousands of women show up at the local church in bridal attire only to have the minister tell them it’s a practical joke. The rest of the movie is Buster running away from the hoard of angry brides in rather hilarious and cartoon-ish manner. Don’t worry though, this is a comedy and there is a happy ending.

Now I’m headed off to a different kind of ending – the end of Nisei Week. If you’re anywhere around Downtown L.A., come on over to Little Tokyo and enjoy the festivities. It’s gonna be a blast!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s